In Mexico, Mole Means Fiesta

Photo credit: Brenda Storch

Very few words say “fiesta” and “Mexico” as loud and clear as “mole” does, particularly in the countryside, where this traditional dish is served during important celebrations such as weddings and christenings. Its preparation, as much as its enjoyment, both constitute a time of bonding.

Mole has permeated the vignettes and meanings that make up our culture to such degree, that in fact, in Mexico, the phrase, “huele a mole” (it smells like mole) is used as a way to hint at the likelihood of a wedding taking place in the near future.  When someone says, “eres ajonjolí de todos los moles¨ (you are like sesame seed sprinkled in every mole), it means that the person is a social butterfly.

Aside from seasoning our language, mole seasons life through its variety of executions, all just as proud and artisanal. Whether Pueblan, Veracruzan or Oaxacan, this rich sweet and spicy sauce is always as intricate and proud as the hands that prepare it.

Recently, we posted a recipe for Veracruzan mole, and today, chef Jason Rivas shares with our readers how he brings mole to life in his home in California. ¡Buen provecho!

About chef Jason Rivas:  Born and raised in California, but southwestern at heart, his  passion for food started at a very early age when he used to eat snails in his backyard. Trained in classical French cuisine, while attending the Scottsdale Culinary Institute, he was able to learn a new way to apply his creative, artistic side. After graduation, Rivas spent an additional four years in Phoenix learning the finer points of southwestern cuisine, and then traveled from coast to coast before settling in the Southern California wine country.  Here, he discovered the true value and impact of food and wine (in his words,”wine and food, rather”).  Find more about chef Rivas on his website: dinnerbyJR.wordpress.com

One thought on “In Mexico, Mole Means Fiesta

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s