Tag Archives: VitaminT

Méx-O-Logy – Receta para Hacer Mezcalina de Pepino

 

Ya se acercan las fiestas decembrinas, y si estás pensando agasajar a tus invitados con una bebida original y deliciosa, hoy te tenemos una con mucho sabor a México.

Sirve: 12

  • 6 caballitos de mezcal
  • 1 pepino pelado
  • 1 manzana verde pelada
  • 3 limones verdes (el jugo)
  • 6 caballitos de miel de manzana o de licor de manzana
  • 1 refresco de toronja
  • 1 botella agua mineral
  • Sal de gusano de magey
  • Hielo

PROCEDIMIENTO

  1. Licúa el mezcal, el pepino, la miel o el licor de manzana, y el jugo de limón.
  2. Sirve en un vaso en las rocas con refresco y agua mineral.
  3. Escarcha el vaso con limón, y sal de gusano de maguey.

¡Salud!

Según la receta de la chef Atzimba Pérez, reproducida con el permiso de la autora.  Para más información sobre Atzimba, visíta  su página de Facebook haciendo click aquí. 

 

A Party to Die For: Negra Modelo Celebrates Día de Muertos with Rick Bayless

 

Photo: Neal Agustin
In Mexico, ordering a ´dead´Negra Modelo, means you are looking for a really cold one. Photo: Neal Agustin

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Undoubtedly, one of my favorite rituals of el Día de Muertos, is cooking with the family, along with setting up the ofrenda (literally, “offering”) in honor of those who have departed.  Ofrendas are created to remember, invoke and delight our deceased relatives, and are the centerpiece of this symbolicaly-rich celebration.

My maternal grandmother took this festivity very seriously, and since her unexpected departure a few years ago, my uncle and my mother make a yearly pilgrimage to my grandma’s native Puebla, to continue on this three-thousand-year old tradition.

Ofrenda in honor of my grandma Julia.
Ofrenda in honor of my grandma Julia.

I did not make it to Mexico this time around, but luckily for me, Mexico came to Chicago. I had the privilege to be invited to celebrate el Día de Muertos with one of my favorite Mexican imports, Negra Modelo.  Negra Modelo drafted no other than Chef Rick Bayless to delight us with a walkthrough of this fantastic Mexican celebration through a few dishes.

During the event, I had the privilege to chat with Bayless, and hear his point of view on Mexican food and its execution outside of Mexico. An anthropologist at heart, this celebrated ambassador of Mexican cuisine, understands the cultural forces that have shaped Mexican food across the US.

 After the mariachi serenaded guests, (what a perfect touch!) Bayless delivered a cooking demonstration from a stage designed to look just like an ofrenda.

Neal Agustin
Photo: Neal Agustin
Photo: Neal Agustin
Photo: Neal Agustin

Guests were later delighted with a variety of fantastic Mexican dishes from this presentation. We are very excited to share one of these recipes with you so that you can bring it to life in your own kitchen.

Sugar skulls are a ubiquitous element of el Día de Muertos. They serve as a reminder that death awaits us at any corner. Negra Modelo invited local artists to create personalized handcrafts for guests to take home.

I was already a fan of the creamy, malty flavor of Negra Modelo, and after this party,  I have no doubt I will continue to like it in the afterlife.

Disclosure: I am a blogger sponsored by Negra Modelo. All opinions are my own.

 

Estampas de mi Ciudad – Death is a Party

  

“The Mexican is familiar with death, jokes about it, caresses it, sleeps with it, and celebrates it. It is one of his favorite playthings and his most steadfast love.”   

-Octavio Paz

Photos: Lissette Storch – Puebla, Mexico

In modern Mexico exchanging sugar skulls is a playful part of the celebration of el Día de Muertos, a festivity as complex, colorful and surreal as the Mexican people themselves. It is also a clear illustrative of Mexicans’ ancestral relationship with death.

Death is a verb and a noun.

In Mexico, death is an ultimate experience of life, and in what seems to be a constant attempt to make it look approachable, we have made her look human and we have dressed her up; we have given her nicknames, le hablamos de tú*.

Death is a ‘she’.

Originally, sugar skulls were created as a reminder of the fact that death  awaits us at any turn, and it is one of  the many expressions of our inevitable relationship with “the lady with many names”: La Catrina (“the rich or elegant one”), La Tía de las Muchachas (“the girls’ aunt”), La Fría (“the cold one”), La Novia Blanca (“the white bride”). Death is a character that wanders amongst us.

Death is life.

Like any other Mexican celebration, food is at the center of el Día de Muertos. Along with pan de muerto (literally, “bread of dead”) and cempasúchil flowers, sugar skulls are staples of this festivity. It is virtually impossible to stumble upon any particular element of  el Día de Muertos that does not have a deliberate purpose or meaning. From the bread that symbolizes the circle of life and communion with the body of the dead, to the flowers that make a nod to the ephemeral nature of life, this ritual, especially in rural Mexico, is rich in both form and content.

I grew up in the city, and for the most part, I participated in these festivities as a spectator. It was not until my grandmother died a few years ago, when my uncle and my mother took over perpetuating this three-thousand-year-old tradition, that I became involved and more intrigued by it.

Year after year, the family travels to a small village in the outskirts of Puebla to  set up an ofrenda for my grandmother, my great-grandmother, and other deceased  relatives. They are remembered with their favorite food and dishes. My grandmother  for example, loved to cook, so aside from prepared meals, her favorite kitchen tools are also set around her picture.

Candles are used either as symbol of hope and faith, or as a way to light the path of the dead as they descend. Water is included to quench the thirst of the souls, and as a symbol of purity. With these ofrendas, the dead  are remembered and invoked.

The celebration continues in the cemetery, where the living and the souls eat together, listen to music, and even enjoy fireworks.

For a few days in November, in Mexico, death is a party.

The cementery of San Francisco Acatepec, where my grandmother is buried.
Hablar de tú‘ means to address someone casually, vs. the respectfully ‘usted’ that is reserved to address those who you don’t know or those who haven’t granted you permission to do otherwise.

 

Nuestra Mesa – Receta para Hacer Pan de Muerto

Foto: Manuel Rivera Ciudad de México, México

Con las celebraciones del Día de Muertos a la vuelta de la esquina, pensamos en traerles la receta para hacer un tradicional, delicioso e indispensable pan de muerto.

Esta receta requiere dejar reposar los primeros ingredientes durante un día, así que si piensan hacerla, les recomendamos prepararla con tiempo suficiente.

Rinde para 45 panes de 100 gr. cada uno o un pan familiar de aproximadamente 4.5 kilos.

Paso 1:

Ingredientes

  • 120 gr. levadura fresca (usa 1/3 de la cantidad si es que piensas usar levadura artificial)
  • 340 ml. de agua
  • 400 gr. de harina

Proceso

  1. Entibia el agua en el microondas
  2. Revuelve los ingredientes con el agua hasta formar una masa
  3. Deja reposar la masa por un dia entero en un recipiente engrasado con aceite. Cubre el recipiente con plástico y colócalo en un lugar fresco.

Paso 2:

Ingredientes

  • 32 huevos
  • 320 gr. azúcar
  • 2.250 kg harina
  • 40 gr. de sal
  • 1 kg. mantequilla
  • 4 cucharadas de agua de azahar

Proceso

  1. Incorpora los primeros cuatro ingredientes con el agua de azahar,  hasta formar una masa homogénea y que no se pegue.
  2. Agrega la masa que preparaste un día anterior sigue amasando hasta que este bien incorporada.
  3. Deja que la mantequilla esté a temperatura ambiente y  agrégala en trozos de alrededor de 100 gr.  hasta integrarla toda.
  4. Forma bolas  de 100 gr si quieres hacer porciones individuales y de 400 gr.  para hacer un pan familiar.
  5. Forma los huesitos con pedazos pequeños de masa, Las puedes rodar en la mesa y aplanarla con los dedos.
Foto: Manuel Rivera – Ciudad de México, México

6. Barniza con yema de huevo y deja fermentar durante una hora.

Foto: Manuel Rivera – Ciudad de México, México

7. Mete tu mezcla a hornear a 200 grados hasta que los panes estén de  color café claro

8. Saca tus panes del horno y déjalos enfriar.

9. Derrite mantequilla y barniza con ella los panes. Después espolvoréalos con azúcar refinada hasta que queden cubiertos

¡Acompaña tu pan con un buen chocolate!

El chef Aldo Saavedra ha cocinado para huéspedes de establecimientos como el conocido Hotel Condesa D.F. y ha contribuído con sus recetas en proyectos con marcas de la talla de Larousse y Danone. En Nuestra Mesa, el chef Saavedra comparte con los lectores de La Vitamina T, su pasión por la cocina y por México.

Receta: Pastel de Elote

Foto: Chef Atzimba Pérez
Foto: Chef Atzimba Pérez

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Hace unas semanas tuve el privilegio de conocer a la chef Atzimba Pérez, orgullosa embajadora de la comida mexicana en Chicago.  Para esta extraordinaria michoacana, (cuyo nombre significa “princesa de agua” en Purépecha), la gastronomía ha sido una constante en su vida.

Parte destino, parte camino, Atzimba nos cuenta que su mamá preparaba la comida para celebrar las fiestas patronales, mientras ella ayudaba y observaba cómo se les daba vida a los platillos típicos de su pueblo. Atzimba nos dice: “Yo tenía mucha inquietud por descubrir nuevos sabores, y probar formas diferentes de hacer las cosas. Desde chica yo tenía mis recetarios y mis libros de cocina.” Más tarde, Atzimba abrió una lonchería para pagarse la carrera en gastronomía: “La comida era mi sustento físico y mi sustento económico. En la escuela vendía pies de queso para poder costear mis prácticas semanales.”

Plato a plato, Atzimba ha conseguido un lugar  como representante de la cocina mexicana en Chicago, donde recientemente estableció su propia compañía de banquetes.

Su comida es tan hermosa y orgullosamente mexicana como su nombre. Hoy, para celebrar lo que queda del mes patrio, les comparto con mucha emoción la receta de la chef Atzimba Pérez para preparar pastel de elote.

Ingredientes



  • 3 tazas de elote tierno
  • 5 huevos
  • 1 lata de leche condensada
  • 1/2 barrita de mantequilla
  • 1/4 de taza de aceite de maíz
  • 1 cucharadita de vainilla
  • 1 taza de harina
  • 1 1/2 cucharadita de polvo para hornear

Procedimiento

  1. Cierne la harina y el polvo para hornear.
  2. Derrite la mantequilla y licúala con el resto de los ingredientes
  3. Mezcla con la harina y el polvo para hornear
  4. Engrasa y enharina 1 molde refractario rectangular mediano ó 2 moldes pequeños.
  5. Vacía la mezcla y pónla a hornear a 320° durante 45 minutos hasta que obtenga un color miel.

Disfrútalo con un vaso de leche fría.

Según la receta de la chef Atzimba Pérez, reproducida con el permiso de la autora.  Para más información sobre Atzimba, visíta  su página de Facebook haciendo click aquí. 

Receta – Flan de Queso Cotija con Salsa de Piloncillo y Mezcal

Foto cortesía del chef Moisés Salazar
Foto cortesía del chef Moisés Salazar

“Para todo mal, mezcal, y para todo bien también”, dice el dicho oaxaqueño. Del náhuatl “mezcalli” que significa “agave horneado”, esta bebida artesanal mucho menos famosa que el tequila, poco a poco ha ido conquistando a paladares tanto mexicanos, como extranjeros.  Esta semana y para empezar este mes patrio con el pie derecho, el chef Moisés Salazar, nos trae una receta para hacer un delicioso flan con mezcal.

Utensilios

  • Molde para flan con tapa de presión
  • Olla express o de presión
  • Base para baño maria
  • Licuadora
  • Horno

Ingredientes

  • 1 lata de lechera (400 grs)
  • 1 lata de leche clavel o evaporada (350 ml)
  • Vainilla
  • 6 huevos (310 grs)
  • 200 gramos de queso cotija
  • 250 grs piloncillo
  • 100 ml de agua
  • 200 ml de mezcal de tu elección

Procedimiento

1. En una sartén, calienta el  piloncillo y el mezcal con un poco de agua hasta que se derritan formando un caramelo.

2. Licua los ingredientes, deja reposar la mezcla en el refrigerador para que salgan todas las burbujas de aire.

3. En el molde para flan, vacía la mitad del caramelo y la mezcla de todos los ingredientes.

4. Colóca la mezcla en la olla

express sobre la base para baño maría y agrega agua sin que toque el molde.

5. Cuando la olla express empiece a soltar vapor, cuenta 15 minutos y sácala de la misma. Espera a que enfríe. Después, métela en el refrigerador.

6. Al servir agrega el resto de la salsa caramelo encima del flan.

Chef Moisés Salazar

El chef Moisés Salazar es un mexicano experto en Alta Cocina, dedicado al catering corporativo y privado. Su pasión lo ha llevado desde Belize, donde estuvo a cargo de delegaciones diplomáticas  de la Embajada de México, Estados Unidos y vario países centroamericanos, hasta Atlanta, donde colaboró en el famoso St. Regis.  Encuentra más información sobre el chef Moisés Salazar y su contribución al  mundo de la gastronomía en su sitio web: www.chefmoises.com

Carnitas Uruapan – The Best of Michoacán in Pilsen

Inocencio and Marcos Carbajal personally host patrons at Carnitas Uruapan.
Pride and Joy: Inocencio and Marcos Carbajal personally host patrons at their famous Pilsen restaurant Carnitas Uruapan.

Inocencio Carbajal becomes emotional as he shares a very personal story. In the late 70s, as a recent transplant from Uruapan, Michoacán, he had to make the decision to let go of his most precious possession- a medal of the Virgin of Guadalupe. “I asked Her to bless my choice,” says Inocencio, his eyes tearing up. “We bought our first piece of equipment with that money.”

Fast-forward four decades later, and Inocencio’s hardship has paid off.  As we arrived at the Pilsen eatery, a long line of patrons had already assembled.  Marcos Carbajal, Inocencio’s son, kindly invited us to tour the kitchen while we found a spot to talk.

The state of Michoacán in southwestern Mexico, is famous for its carnitas, one of Mexico’s favorite folk dishes. Usually cooked in large copper containers brought in from a specific neighboring town,  it is not uncommon to also find this treat being prepared in large stainless steel pots. “In many villages, eating carnitas is a Sunday morning ritual,” said Marcos, who periodically visits family in Uruapan, his father’s birthplace. “People know to arrive early, as usually only one pig is prepared, and they usually gather to eat after church. Many of our customers still follow this custom, but we cook a fresh batch every two hours.”

Although he kept in his heart the desire to go back to Michoacán at some point, Inocencio’s family and his growing business kept him in Pilsen. “All of a sudden, Marcos was ready to go to college, and I was happy that he had the opportunity,” said Inocencio.  For Marcos,  the word “pigskin” is not merely a seasonal one. With a degree in Economics from the University of Michigan, and thinking of helping his dad, Marcos left his corporate job to work in the restaurant full time, while also pursuing a Master’s Degree in Entrepreneurship from Northwestern University.

Although Inocencio has not returned to Uruapan, he has brought Uruapan to Chicago with him. The path he chose was not easy but, he says smiling, “I would do it all over again”.

His eatery’s menu is perfectly simple, with many well-achieved crowd pleasers. From mouthwatering pork carnitas, to menudo, chicharrón en salsa de tomate ( chicharrón in tomato sauce, of which I took a big container home), cacti salad and even quesadillas de sesos (brain-stuffed quesadillas), this place is the real deal. In fact, the cueritos I tried here are the best I have ever had in both, texture and flavor.

Carnitas Uruapan did not disappoint. My stomach was full and happy, and after talking to Inocencio and Marcos, my heart was too.

¡Viva México!

Carnitas Uruapan

1725 W 18th St  Chicago, IL 60608

(312) 226-2654

Ger a free carnitas taco with your to go order and and free order of chicharrón if you check-in on Facebook.

 

Quesadilla: More than Cheese Meets the Tortilla

Delicious quesadillas made with blue-corn tortillas materialize right in front of patrons’ eyes in La Marquesa, Mexico. Photo: Lissette Storch
Delicious quesadillas made with blue-corn tortillas materialize right in front of patrons’ eyes in La Marquesa, Mexico. Photo: Lissette Storch

You will never go hungry in Mexico City, where quesadillas,sopes and other garnachas* are easily found street-side and served either as a snack or a meal. Filled with a variety of stuffings ranging from flowers and vegetables, to meat and even insects, these portable pockets of pure joy are a staple of any modern Mexican meal. Given the apparent simplicity of their execution, it would be easy to assume thatquesadillas are predictable and uninteresting, but skilled artisan hands bring these delicacies to life in such way, thatdefeños** will consider traveling to indulge in a perfect one. La Marquesa, a national park west of Mexico City, is a popular weekend getaway as well as a quesadilla haven. Here, locals and visitors are able to choose from a multitude of establishments offering a variety of quesadillas among other local delicacies that include trout and even rabbit.

For a sampling of Mexico´s mestizo nature in a bite, (the fusion concept of a quesadilla already combines the Spanish word for “queso” with the Aztec word “tortilla“) try a chorizoand cheese quesadilla. More pre-Hispanic stuffings includeflor de calabaza (zucchini blossoms) or huitlacoche (corn fungus). The latter might not sound too terribly appealing, but trust me, there is a reason why Mexicans have consider it a treat for centuries.

If you are in Mexico City and the foodie in you wants to venture to La Marquesa, we recommend making a day trip out of this culinary excursion. Consider hiring a reputable cab company to drive you to and from the food area. La Marquesa is about an hour away from downtown Mexico City.

*Garnachas: Slang term for comfort-food, usually made out of corn on a comal.

**Defeño: A citizen of Mexico City.

Chiles en Nogada: The Dish of a Revolution

Photo credit: Lissette Storch  Mexico City, Mexico
Photo credit: Lissette Storch Mexico City, Mexico

If you have the good fortune to be in Mexico late in the fall, you will likely find chiles en nogada appear on many menus. Literally “peppers in walnut sauce”, this seasonal delicacy attributed to the state of Puebla, was served for the first time in the 19th century to celebrate Mexico’s independence from Spain.

Part prayer, part recipe, the story tells that Augustine nuns from Atlixco, Puebla improvised this dish in honor of Mexican caudillo* (and later Mexico´s first emperor) Agustín de Yturbide, who made a stop in Puebla on his way to Mexico City after signing a document in Veracruz establishing Mexico´s independence. Fittingly, green, white and red, the colors of the Mexican flag, are represented on the plate.

Part warrior, part angel, chiles en nogada calls for poblano peppers to be stuffed with a mixture of meat and fruits, which allows for a variety of textures in every bite. To top it off, the walnut sauce is very light and deliciously accented with pomegranate, available in central Mexico through mid September.

Part indigenous, part Spanish, this plate is all Mexico, and the edible equivalent to CliffsNotes on this country’s dichotomies both in personality and history.

Do not pass up the opportunity to try it.

We recommend:

 La Hostería de Santo Domingo 

Belisario Domínguez 7o, Mexico City

La Parrilla Leonesa

Blvd. Manuel Ávila Camacho 1515, Cd. Satélite, Edo. de México

*Military leader

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Recipe: Beat the Heat with Mezcal and Sesame Seed Ice Cream – Nuestra Mesa

Photo: Manuel Rivera
Photo: Manuel Rivera

To beat this summer heat with a unique Mexican version of ice cream, our friend and contributor chef Aldo Saavedra, shared with us a recipe to make a delicious mezcal and sesame seed treat.

Just like tequila, mezcal is made from agave. This smokey-flavored artisanal drink is slowly becoming popular as another Mexican contribution to gastronomy worldwide.

Ingredients: 

Ice Cream Base

This is the foundation for any ice cream, and it can be used to create any other flavor. The sky is the limit! It is all up to your imagination.

  • 2/3 cup of sugar
  • 10 egg yolks
  • 1 1/2 cups of heavy cream
  • 1 1/2 cups of whole milk

Mezcal and Sesame Seed

  • 7 tbsp of your favorite mezcal
  • 2 cups of toasted sesame seeds
  • 2 cups of semisweet chocolate (in chunks)

 Process:

  1. Boil the milk along with the cream and mezcal in a pot.
  2. In a separate container, whip the egg yolks with the sugar until fluffy.
  3. Once your milk mixture has reached the boiling point, add half of the volume to the whipped egg yolks, and continue to whip until the yolks and the mix are incorporated.
  4. Add the whipped egg yolks to the pot on the stove and stir with a wooden spoon on low heat until the mix thickens.

5. You will know it is time to remove your mix from the stove, once you are able to draw a finger on the wooden spoon without it dripping. Remove and let the mix cool over ice.


6. Once cold, put the mix in a blender with the sesame seed and blend.  Strain.
7. Transfer the strained mixture into a container and place in the freezer. Stir about every 10 minutes until it reaches the desired consistency.
8. Add the chocolate and mix.

You can store your ice cream in plastic containers in the freezer. Enjoy!

Mexican Chef Aldo Saavedra regularly shares with La Vitamina T’s readers his passion for his country and for Mexican cuisine as a cultural expression. Chef Saavedra has been part of the team in charge of delighting guests at a variety of reputable establishments, including Hotel Condesa D.F. He has also partnered in projects with global brands such as Larousse and Danone

Nuestra Mesa – Empanadas de Plátano Macho*

Empanadas de plátano. Foto: Manuel Rivera
Foto: Manuel Rivera

Las empanadas deben su moderna popularidad a los colonizadores españoles y portugueses, quienes las introdujeron a lo largo y ancho de América Latina y otras colonias.  En México, la selección de empanadas que forman parte del acervo culinario popular, incluye una variante de raíces inglesas: los pastes. Famosos en el estado de Hidalgo, este plato encuentra su origen en los cornish pasties, mismo que fue introducido al país por mineros británicos.

Adaptadas para reflejar los sabores e ingredientes de donde quiera que vayan, las empanadas son una encarnación local de este concepto español. Hoy, el chef Aldo Saavedra, nos trae una receta para hacer unas deliciosas empanadas rellenas de México.

Rinde para 20 piezas  
Ingredientes:
  • 1 kg de plátano macho maduro
  • 30 ml de vinagre blanco
  • 4 cdtas de azúcar.
  • 300 gr de harina de trigo
  • Sal y pimienta al gusto
  • Frijoles negros refritos
  • Epazote
  • Queso panela
Procedimiento:
1- Lava los plátanos, haz unos pequeños cortes a la cáscara  (3 ó 4 por pieza).
2- Pon agua a hervir (la cantidad que sea suficiente para cubrir los plátanos). Agrega el vinagre y el azúcar, y los plátanos. Después de que suelte el hervor, cuenta 5 minutos.
3- Retira. Escúrrelos y pela los plátanos en caliente.
4- Machaca los plátanos haciendo un puré que sea lo más fino posible. Incorpora la harina, sal y pimienta. Mezcla bien.
5- Deja enfriar. Refrigera durante 2 horas.
6- Saca la mezcla del refrigerador y forma pequeñas bolas con la mezcla. Prensa con una prensa para hacer tortillas cuidando que la empanada no quede muy delgada.
7- Rellena con una cucharadita de frijoles, un pedazo de queso y una hoja de epazote.  Cierra la empanada y pónla a freír hasta que tome un color dorado.
8. Escurre, sirve y disfruta.
* En México, el plátano macho es un plátano más grande que el común y no puede comerse crudo. En otros países se les conoce como hartón o maduro. En Estados Unidos es similar al ¨green plantain¨.
El chef Aldo Saavedra ha cocinado para huéspedes de establecimientos como el conocido Hotel Condesa D.F. y ha contribuído con sus recetas en proyectos con marcas de la talla de Larousse y Danone. En Nuestra Mesa, el chef Saavedra comparte con los lectores de La Vitamina T, su pasión por la cocina y por México.

Tamales de Mango del Chef Paco – New Rebozo

Tamales con queso de cabra, chipotle y salsa de mango como solo en New Rebozo.
Tamales con queso de cabra, chipotle y salsa de mango como solo en New Rebozo. Foto: Brenda Storch

El Chef Paco del conocido restaurante New Rebozo, en Chicago, generosamente nos compartió esta receta para hacer estos deliciosos tamales de queso de cabra y chipotle con salsa de mango. ¡Que los disfruten!

Masa

  • 1 kilo de masa blanca de maíz para tamal
  • 1   1/2 tazas de caldo pollo o agua
  • 1  taza de aceite de olivo
  • 1 cucharada de sal
  • 150 gr. de queso de cabra
  • 1 cucharadita de salsa de chile chipotle
  • 35 rectángulos de hoja de tamal de unos 18 x 15 cm.

Salsa

  • 2 mangos, pelados y cortados en cubitos
  • 1 chile jalapeño
  • 1/2 cebolla picada
  • 1/3 pimiento rojo finamente picado
  • 1/3 pimiento amarillo finamente picado
  • 1/2 manojo de cilantro cortado en pedazos pequeños
  • Sal y pimienta al gusto

Pon lo ingredientes en un recipiente hondo y mézclalos hasta que estén bien incorporados.

Preparación:

  • Mezcla la masa en el caldo hasta que quede incorporado todo. Prueba la sazón.
  • Con una cuchara sopera, pon en el centro de la hoja la masa, el queso de cabra y el chile chipotle.
  • Envuélvelo como un burrito de 5 x 7 centímetros. Salen como 36 tamalitos.
  • Prepara la vaporera con agua, pon los tamales y tápala.
  • Pón los tamales a cocer con flama alta.  Una vez que empiece a salir el vapor, baja la flama a fuego medio y deja cocinar durante alrededor de 50 minutos.
  • Déja reposar los tamales hasta servirlos con la salsa.

¡Oh My God!

Receta publicada con el permiso del autor. 

Chef Paco´s New Rebozo – Oh My God!

Cochinita pibil tacos await you at New Rebozo in Chicago's Gold Coast.
Cochinita pibil tacos await you at New Rebozo in Chicago’s Gold Coast.

If you visit New Rebozo, chances are that aside from a remarkable meal, you will be delighted by owner Chef Paco’s warm and exuberant personality.  After more than 20 years of success at his Oak Park location, where Chef Paco (A.K.A. Francisco López) is already a fixture, this Mexico City native decided to bring his creativity and passion for authentic Mexican food to Chicago’s Gold Coast.

Holy mole! Chef Paco delights his guests with his complex, yet surprisingly down-to-earth mole Poblano, at New Rebozo.

Chef Paco equates food to the dynamics of everyday life: “Life can be sweet and sour… even salty, add love to it and you will strike a balance.”  His philosophy spills into every corner of his restaurant. There is definitely love in New Rebozo, named after a shawl Mexican women wear. From the cozy fireplace to the thoughtfully picked art, the dining room and patio embrace you like welcoming Mexican embassies. Do not expect to find cultural clichés here.  New Rebozo is the real deal both in form and content. “My work is about making people happy,” said Paco. “That’s my ultimate goal.”

Full of flavor, depth and whimsy, it is so fitting that mole is one of Chef Paco´s specialties. Very few words say fiesta and Mexico as loud and clear as mole does, particularly in the countryside, where this traditional dish is served during important celebrations such as weddings and christenings. Chef Paco´s mole Poblano is so good, I have no doubt that my Pueblan grandma, who was often charged with making the mole for her village’s fiestas patronales*,  would have approved.

Watermelon mojitos: Oh my God!
Watermelon mojitos: Oh my God!

If you visit New Rebozo,  do not miss the cochinita pibil tacos, a delicacy straight from Yucatán. There is a piece of Mexican heaven in every perfectly flavorful bite and they are surprisingly not greasy. The watermelon mojitos are also quite memorable- one sip of those glorious cocktails had my entire table exclaiming in unison: “Oh my God!”

*In Mexico, fiestas patronales are a village’s most important celebration, and are typically dedicated to the patron saint the village is named after.

New Rebozo Chicago

46 E. Superior

Chicago, IL 60611

(312) 202-9141

Open Mon-Sun 12-10 pm

New Rebozo Chicago on Urbanspoon

Nuestra Mesa – Tinga Vegetariana

Foto: Manuel Rivera
Foto: Manuel Rivera

 

Generalmente hecha con carne deshebrada, la tinga es un delicioso platillo típico mexicano, proveniente del estado de Puebla. Usualmente servida como guarnición o en tostadas y tacos, la tinga es invitada favorita de fiestas y taquizas.

Hoy, el chef Aldo Saavedra nos trae a Nuestra Mesa, una versión vegetariana de este rico plato. Esta receta, además de diferente, es fácil de hacer y muy sana. ¡Qué la disfruten!

 

Tinga de Zanahoria

Ingredientes: 

  • ½ kg cebolla
  • ½ kg jitomate
  • 1 kg zanahoria
  • 3 chiles chipotles en escabeche
  • 5 hojas de laurel
  • 4 cdta aceite girasol
  • sal y pimienta negra

Proceso

  1. Lava las cebollas, los jitomates y las zanahorias.
  2. Corta las cebollas por la mitad y después en medias lunas muy delgadas. Reservar.
  3. En una cacerola, pon a calentar el aceite.  Sofríe la cebolla hasta que se vuelva transparente y haya reducido su tamaño a menos de la mitad.
  4. Pela y ralla la zanahoria, agrega a la cebolla y continúa moviendo.
  5. Muele el jitomate y viértelo en la cacerola junto con el laurel.
  6. Déjalo cocinar hasta que el jitomate se cueza  y reduzca.
  7. Sazona con sal  y pimienta y agrega los chiles o solo el caldo de la lata (depende del nivel de picante que le quieras dar ).
  8. Sírvela en tostadas. Si lo deseas, puedes agregarle crema , queso y frijoles.

 

El chef Aldo Saavedra ha cocinado para huéspedes de establecimientos como el conocido Hotel Condesa D.F. y ha contribuído con sus recetas en proyectos con marcas de la talla de Larousse y Danone. En Nuestra Mesa, el chef Saavedra comparte con los lectores de La Vitamina T, su pasión por la cocina y por México.

Méx-O-Logy – Mojito: A Prescription for Summer

Make your own raspberry mojito. Photo credit: Myrna Rodríguez
Photo credit: Myrna Rodríguez

By: Myrna Rodríguez

Did you know Mojito was created as a medicinal recipe? The original pirates of the Caribbean used to drink it to fight scurvy. While mixing lime, water and spices to hide the strong taste of unrefined rum, they stumbled upon this refreshing recipe.

Luckily for us, the production process of rum has been greatly improved. Mojitos, later popularized by Ernest Hemingway, are so sweet and refreshing, that they remain a preferred summer “elixir” around the world.

My favorite mojito recipe  combines the sweetness of rum and sugar with the acidity of raspberry and lime. The mint oils give this antidote for stress its distinctive flavor and refreshing qualities.

Are you wondering what kind of rum to use?  Available rums today hail from tropical and not so tropical destinations and feature different levels of alcohol and local flavors. At the end of the day, the best rum is really the one you like.

¡Salud!

Raspberry Mojito

Ingredients:

  • 12 peppermint leaves
  • ½ lime (cut into 4 wedges)
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 8 raspberries
  • 1 ½ oz white rum
  • 3 oz carbonated water

Process:

  1. Combine the peppermint leaves, lime, sugar and raspberries in a glass. Muddle with 10 to 15 strokes, just enough to squeeze as much juice out of the lime as possible and to puree the raspberries.
  2. Take this same glass with the mint mix at the bottom and fill it up with ice cubes.
  3. Add the rum, top the glass with the carbonated water and mix.

Tip: you can create a mix of berries to make it fun and add different flavors.

Mexican transplant Myrna Rodríguez, conjures up Latin-influenced libations.
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A business woman by profession, and a mixologist by passion, Myrna Rodríguez holds a masters degree in business and is a certified mixologist. Inquisitive and creative, she keeps up with new techniques, while drawing inspiration from her two grandmothers (one Mexican and one Honduran). Raised and educated in Monterrey, Mexico, Myrna infuses her recipes with Latin American flavors and ingredients, and brings an exciting twist to traditional drinks.

Find Myrna sampling food around Chicago, or delighting her lucky friends and acquaintances with Mexican-influenced beverages.